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Bountiful, Utah, United States

Kasatkin A.V.,Russian Academy of Sciences | Plasil J.,ASCR Institute of Physics Prague | Pekov I.V.,Moscow State University | Belakovskiy D.I.,Russian Academy of Sciences | And 5 more authors.
Journal of Geosciences (Czech Republic) | Year: 2015

Karpenkoite (IMA 2014-092), ideally Co3(V2O7)(OH)2·2H2O, is a new divanadate mineral species, the cobalt analogue of martyite, found at the Little Eva mine, Grand County, Utah, USA. It occurs on sandstone matrix in close association with martyite, quartz, gypsum, baryte, roscoelite and an unidentified Al vanadate. Karpenkoite is a secondary mineral formed during the post-mining oxidation of corvusite and montroseite in a moist environment at ambient temperatures. The new mineral occurs as lamellar crystals, coarsely hexagonal or irregular in shape, typically curved. The crystals form rose-like clusters or globular aggregates up to 0.2 mm across. Karpenkoite is orange with pale yellow-orange streak. It is transparent with a vitreous luster. The mineral is brittle, with laminated fracture and perfect cleavage on {001}. The calculated density is 3.415 g cm-3. The mineral is optically uniaxial (+), with ω = 1.827(8) and ε = 1.843(8). The chemical composition of karpenkoite (wt. %, electron-microprobe data) is: MgO 0.05, CaO 0.26, MnO 1.39, CoO 33.22, NiO 2.02, CuO 0.28, ZnO 12.66, V2O5 38.70, H2O (calc.) 11.61, total 100.19. The empirical formula, calculated on the basis of 11 O apfu, is (Co2.06Zn0.72Ni0.13Mn0.09Ca0.02Cu0.02Mg0.01)Σ3.05V1.98O7(OH)2·2H2O. The Raman spectrum demonstrates symmetric stretching and bending vibrations of V5+O3 units and the O–H stretching and bending vibrations of the H2O molecules. The new mineral is trigonal, the most probable space group is (Formula presented.) (by analogy with its Zn analogue martyite), a = 6.016(4), c = 7.234(6) Å, V = 226.7(2) Å3 and Z = 1. The strongest powder X-ray diffraction lines are [dobs,Å(I)(hkl)]: 7.15(100)(001), 5.19(18)(010), 4.20(25)(101,011), 3.59(21)(002), 2.95(54)(012,102), 2.77(21)(111), 2.60(36)(200), and 2.44(33)(201,021). The new mineral is named in honor of the Russian mineralogist Vladimir Yu. Karpenko (b. 1965), an expert on the mineralogy of vanadium. © 2015, Czech Geological Society. All Rights Reserved. Source


Kampf A.R.,Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County | Mararty J.,3457 E. Silver Oak Road | Thorne B.,3898 S. Newport Circle
American Mineralogist | Year: 2010

Housleyite, Pb6CuTe4O18(OH)2, is a new tellurate from Otto Mountain near Baker, California, named in honor of Robert M. Housley. The new mineral occurs on fracture surfaces and in small vugs in brecciated quartz veins. Housleyite is directly associated with acanthite, cerussite, gold, iodargyrite, khinite-4O, wulfenite, and three other new tellurates: Markcooperite, ottoite, and thorneite. A variety of other secondary minerals occur in the veins, including three other new secondary tellurium minerals, paratimroseite, telluroperite, and timroseite. Housleyite is monoclinic, space group P21/n, a = 7.8552(5), b = 10.4836(7), c = 11.0426(8) Å, bβ = 95.547(2)°, and Z = 2. Crystals are prismatic to bladed with elongation parallel to b and typically occur in bow tie-like aggregates, drusy balls, and irregular sprays. It is pale to medium greenish blue and transparent, with pale blue streak and adamantine luster. Mohs hardness is estimated at 3. The mineral is brittle, with an irregular fracture. Cleavage was not observed, but is likely on {101}. The calculated density is 7.845(1) g/cm3. Housleyite is biaxial (+), with 2V = 50° to 60° and strong inclined dispersion, r > v, but indices of refraction are too high to be measured. The optic orientation is Y = b, Z ^ c ≈40° in obtuse β and pleochroism is Y (medium green-blue) > Z (light green-blue) > X. Energy dispersive spectroscopy provided PbO 62.53, CuO 3.77, TeO3 32.85, H3O 0.84 (structure), total 99.99 wt%.; the empirical formula (based on O = 20) is b5.99Cu1.01Te4.00O 18(OH)2. The strongest powder X-ray diffraction lines are [dobs in Å (hkl) I]: 3.336 (202, 031, 122) 69, 3.292 (113) 50, 3.195 (130, 103) 100, 3.068 (221, 202) 47, 3.007 (023) 49, 2.942 (032, 212) 80, 2.723 (123, 213, 132) 29, 2.580 (230, 301, 231) 38. The crystal structure (R1 = 0.028) consists of corner-sharing chains of TeO6 octahedra along [101] linked into slabs parallel to {101} by sharing edges and corners with strongly Jahn-Teller (4+2) distorted and severely skewed CuO 6 octahedra. Lead (Pb) atoms in lopsided nine- and elevenfold coordinations form additional links within and between the octahedral sheets. Source


Kampf A.R.,Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County | Mills S.J.,Khan Research Laboratories | Housley R.M.,California Institute of Technology | Rossman G.R.,California Institute of Technology | And 2 more authors.
American Mineralogist | Year: 2013

Bairdite, Pb2Cu4 2+Te2 6+O10(OH)2(SO4)(H2O), is a new tellurate-sulfate from Otto Mountain near Baker, California, U.S.A. It occurs in vugs in quartz associated with khinite, cerussite, goethite, and hematite. It is interpreted as having formed from the partial oxidation of primary sulfides and tellurides during or following brecciation of quartz veins. Bairdite is monoclinic, space group P21/c, with unit-cell dimensions a = 14.3126(10), b = 5.2267(3), c = 9.4878(5) Å, b = 106.815(7)°, V = 679.41(7) Å3, and Z = 2. Bairdite occurs as diamond-shaped tabular crystals up to about 250 mm long and 5 mm thick, in subparallel and fan-shaped aggregates. The color is lime green, the streak is pale lime green, and the luster is adamantine. The Mohs hardness is estimated at between 2 and 3. Bairdite is brittle with an irregular fracture and one perfect cleavage on {100}. The calculated density based on the empirical formula is 6.062 g/cm 3. Bairdite is biaxial (+), with calculated indices of refraction of a = 1.953, b = 1.966, and g = 2.039. The measured 2V is 47(2)°, dispersion is r < v, strong and the optical orientation is Y = b; Z a = 34° in obtuse angle b. The pleochroism is strong: Z (pale green) < < < X (green) < Y (green). Electron microprobe analyses (average of 4) provided: PbO 34.22, CaO 0.06, CuO 23.80, TeO3 26.34, SO3 5.74, H2O 2.81 (structure), total 92.97 wt%. The empirical formula (based on 17 O atoms pfu) is: Pb2.05Ca0.01Cu3.99 2+Te2.00 6+S0.96O 17.00H4.16. The eight strongest powder X-ray diffraction lines are [dobs in Å (hkl) I]: 4.77 (110,102) 50, 4.522 (002,011,111) 66, 3.48 (multiple) 62, 2.999 (311,411) 97, 2.701 (502,113,213) 79, 2.614 (013,020) 100, 1.727 (multiple) 65, and 1.509 (911,033,324) 83. The crystal structure of bairdite (R1 = 0.072 for 1406 reflections with Fo > 4δF) contains edge-sharing chains of Te 6+O6 and Cu2+O6 octahedra parallel to b that are joined by corner-sharing in the a direction, forming thick stair-step-like hexagonal close packed layers parallel to {100}. The polyhedral sheet has similarities to those in the structures of timroseite and paratimroseite. The thick interlayer region contains PbO10 polyhedra and half-occupied SO4 groups. Raman and infrared spectral data are presented. Source


Kampf A.R.,Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County | Mills S.J.,University of British Columbia | Housley R.M.,California Institute of Technology | Mararty J.,3457 E. Silver Oak Road | Thorne B.,3898 S. Newport Circle
American Mineralogist | Year: 2010

Markcooperite, Pb2(UO2)Te6+O6, is a new tellurate from Otto Mountain near Baker, California, named in honor of Mark A. Cooper of the University of Manitoba for his contributions to mineralogy. The new mineral occurs on fracture surfaces and in small vugs in brecciated quartz veins. Markcooperite is directly associated with bromian chlorargyrite, iodargyrite, khinite-4O, wulfenite, and four other new tellurates: housleyite, thorneite, ottoite, and timroseite. Various other secondary minerals occur in the veins, including two other new secondary tellurium minerals: paratimroseite and telluroperite. Markcooperite is monoclinic, space group P21/c, a = 5.722(2), b = 7.7478(2), c = 7.889(2) Å, β = 90.833(5)°, V = 349.7(2) Å3, and Z = 2. It occurs as pseudotetragonal prisms to 0.2 mm with the forms {100} and {011} and as botryoidal intergrowths to 0.3 mm in diameter; no twinning was observed. Markcooperite is orange and transparent, with a light orange streak and adamantine luster, and is non-fluorescent. Mohs hardness is estimated at 3. The mineral is brittle, with an irregular fracture and perfect {100} cleavage. The calculated density is 8.496 g/cm3 based on the empirical formula. Markcooperite is biaxial (+), with indices of refraction a = 2.11, β = 2.12, ? = 2.29 calculated using the Gladstone-Dale relationship, measured a-β birefringence of 0.01 and measured 2V of 30(5)°. The optical orientation is X = c, Y = b, Z = a. The mineral is slightly pleochroic in shades of orange, with absorption: X > Y = Z. No dispersion was observed. Electron microprobe analysis provided PbO 50.07, TeO3 22.64, UO3 25.01, Cl 0.03, O=Cl -0.01, total 97.74 wt%; the empirical formula (based on O+Cl = 8) is Pb2.05U0.80Te6+ 1.18O7.99Cl0.01. The strongest powder X-ray diffraction lines are [dobs in Å (hkl) I]: 3.235 (120, 102, 102) 100, 2.873 (200) 40, 2.985 (121, 112, 121) 37, 2.774 (022) 30, 3.501 (021, 012) 29, 2.220 (221, 221, 212) 23, 1.990 (222, 222) 21, and 1.715 (320) 22. The crystal structure (R1 = 0.052) is based on sheets of corner-sharing uranyl square bipyramids and tellurate octahedra, with Pb atoms between the sheets. Markcooperite is the first compound to show Te6+ substitution for U6+ within the same crystallographic site. Markcooperite is structurally related to synthetic Pb(UO2)O2. Source


Kampf A.R.,Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County | Mills S.J.,University of British Columbia | Housley R.M.,California Institute of Technology | Mararty J.,3457 E. Silver Oak Road | Thorne B.,3898 S. Newport Circle
American Mineralogist | Year: 2010

Telluroperite, Pb3Te4+O4Cl2, is a new tellurite from Otto Mountain near Baker, California. The new mineral occurs on fracture surfaces and in small vugs in brecciated quartz veins in direct association with acanthite, bromine-rich chlorargyrite, caledonite, cerussite, galena, goethite, and linarite. Various other secondary minerals occur in the veins, including six new tellurates, housleyite, markcooperite, paratimroseite, ottoite, thorneite, and timroseite. Telluroperite is orthorhombic, space group Bmmb, a = 5.5649(6), b = 5.5565(6), c = 12.4750(14) Å, V = 386.37(7) Å3, and Z = 2. The new mineral occurs as rounded square tablets and flakes up to 0.25 mm on edge and 0.02 mm thick. The form {001} is prominent and is probably bounded by {100}, {010}, and {110}. It is bluish-green and transparent, with a pale bluish-green streak and adamantine luster. The mineral is non-fluorescent. Mohs hardness is estimated to be between 2 and 3. The mineral is brittle, with a curved fracture and perfect {001} cleavage. The calculated density based on the empirical formula is 7.323 g/cm3. Telluroperite is biaxial (-), with very small 2V (̃10°). The average index of refraction is 2.219 calculated by the Gladstone-Dale relationship. The optical orientation is X = c and the mineral exhibits moderate bluish-green pleochrosim; absorption: X < Y = Z. Electron microprobe analysis provided PbO 72.70, TeO2 19.26, Cl 9.44, O=Cl -2.31, total 99.27 wt%. The empirical formula (based on O+Cl = 6) is Pb2.79Te4+ 1.03O3.72Cl2.28. The six strongest powder X-ray diffraction lines are [dobs in Å (hkl) I]: 3.750 (111) 58, 2.857 (113) 100, 2.781 (020, 200) 43, 2.075 (024, 204) 31, 1.966 (220) 30, and 1.620 (117, 313, 133) 52. The crystal structure (R1 = 0.056) is based on the Sillén X1 structure-type and consists of a three-dimensional structural topology with lead-oxide halide polyhedra linked to tellurium/lead oxide groups. The mineral is named for the relationship to perite and the dominance of Te (with Pb) in the Bi site of perite. Source

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