3855 Health science Dr

San Diego, CA, United States

3855 Health science Dr

San Diego, CA, United States
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Mell L.K.,3855 Health science Dr | Carmona R.,3855 Health science Dr | Gulaya S.,3855 Health science Dr | Lu T.,3855 Health science Dr | And 3 more authors.
Journal of the National Cancer Institute | Year: 2013

Background Radiotherapy and lymphadenectomy have been associated with improved survival in population-based studies of endometrial cancer, which is in contrast with findings from randomized trials and meta-analyses. The primary study aim was to estimate the cause-specific effects of adjuvant radiotherapy and lymphadenectomy on competing causes of mortality. Methods We analyzed Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) data from 1988 to 2006. The sample comprised 58 172 patients with stage I and II endometrial adenocarcinoma. Patients were risk stratified by stage, grade, and age. Cumulative incidences and cause-specific hazards of competing causes of mortality were estimated according to treatment. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Pelvic radiotherapy was associated with statistically significantly increased endometrial cancer mortality (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.66; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.52 to 1.82) in all stage I and II patients and decreased noncancer mortality in intermediate and high-risk stage I and II patients (HR = 0.82; 95% CI = 0.77 to 0.89). Lymphadenectomy was associated with increased endometrial cancer mortality in stage I patients (HR = 1.27; 95% CI = 1.16 to 1.39), decreased endometrial cancer mortality in stage II patients (HR = 0.61; 95% CI = 0.52 to 0.72), and decreased noncancer mortality in both stage I and II patients (HR = 0.84; 95% CI = 0.80 to 0.88). Effects of radiotherapy and lymphadenectomy on second cancer mortality varied according to risk strata. Conclusions Radiotherapy and lymphadenectomy are associated with statistically significantly reduced noncancer mortality in stage I and II endometrial cancer. The improved overall survival associated with these treatments reported from SEER studies is largely attributable to their selective application in healthier patients rather than their effects on endometrial cancer. © The Author 2013.


PubMed | 3855 Health science Dr
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology | Year: 2011

Patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) are at high risk of death resulting from noncancer causes and second malignancies (ie, competing mortality). Variation in competing mortality risk complicates individual treatment choices and design and interpretation of clinical studies.Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry, we identified 34,568 patients with nonmetastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck diagnosed between 1994 and 2003. We developed a multivariable competing-risk regression model to stratify patients according to competing mortality risk and evaluate the impact of this risk on power loss in clinical studies.The 5-year cumulative incidences of all-cause mortality, HNC-specific mortality, and competing mortality were 51.3% (95% CI, 50.8% to 51.9%), 23.8% (95% CI, 23.3% to 24.2%), and 27.6% (95% CI, 26.8% to 28.3%), respectively. Factors associated with increased competing mortality were increasing age, male sex, black race, unmarried status, localized disease, higher socioeconomic status, nonsurgical treatment, and hypopharyngeal, nasopharyngeal, and oral cavity subsites. The 5-year cumulative incidences of competing mortality for patients in low-, medium-, and high-risk score tertiles were 20.0% (95% CI, 18.8% to 21.3%), 27.7% (95% CI, 26.3% to 29.1%), and 33.7% (95% CI, 32.2% to 35.2%), respectively. Compared with patients with low competing mortality risk, relative sample sizes required to show benefit of a treatment regarding all-cause mortality were 12% and 42% higher in the medium- and high-risk groups, respectively.Multiple factors affect risk of competing mortality among patients with HNC. Risk stratification would be useful to identify patients most likely to benefit from treatment intensification.

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