35 S. Wolcott Ave

Chicago, IL, United States

35 S. Wolcott Ave

Chicago, IL, United States
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Monasky M.M.,35 S. Wolcott Ave | Taglieri D.M.,35 S. Wolcott Ave | Patel B.G.,35 S. Wolcott Ave | Chernoff J.,Fox Chase Cancer Center | And 4 more authors.
American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology | Year: 2012

p21-Activated kinase 1 (Pak1) is a serine/threonine kinase that activates protein phosphatase 2a, resulting in the dephosphorylation of cardiac proteins and increased myofilament Ca 2+ sensitivity. Emerging evidence indirectly indicates a role for Pak1 in ischemia-reperfusion (I/R), but direct evidence is lacking. We hypothesize that activation of the Pak1 signaling pathway is a cardioprotective mechanism that prevents or reverses the detrimental effects of ischemic injury by inducing post-translational modifications in myofilament proteins that ultimately improve cardiac contractility following ischemic insult. In the present study, we subjected ex vivo hearts from wild-type (WT) and Pak1-knockout (KO) mice to 20 min of global cardiac ischemia followed by 30 min of reperfusion. In the absence of Pak1, there was an exacerbation of the increased end-diastolic pressure and reduced left ventricular developed pressure occurring after I/R injury. ProQ analysis revealed an increase in troponin-T phosphorylation at baseline in Pak1-KO hearts compared with WT. Significantly decreased myosin light chain 2 (MLC2) phosphorylation in Pak1-KO hearts compared with WT after I/R injury was confirmed by Western immunoblotting. These data indicate that Pak1-KO hearts have reduced recovery of myocardial performance after global I/R injury concomitant with changes in troponin-T and MLC2 phosphorylation. Finally, a protein-protein association between Pak1 and MLC2, and Pak1 and troponin-T, was determined by coimmunoprecipitation. Thus, results of our study provide a basis for targeting a novel pathway, including Pak1, in the therapies for patients with ischemic events. © 2012 the American Physiological Society.


PubMed | 35 S. Wolcott Ave.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Applied and environmental microbiology | Year: 2010

Listeria monocytogenes secretes two chitinases and one chitin binding protein. Mutants lacking chiA, chiB, or lmo2467 exhibited normal growth in cultured cells but were defective for growth in the livers and spleens of mice. Mammals lack chitin; thus, L. monocytogenes may have adapted chitinases to recognize alternative substrates to enhance pathogenesis.

Loading 35 S. Wolcott Ave collaborators
Loading 35 S. Wolcott Ave collaborators