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Millport, United Kingdom

Moore P.G.,32 Marine Parade
Archives of Natural History | Year: 2015

The coverage of natural history in British newspapers has evolved from a "Nature notes" format - usually a regular column submitted by a local amateur naturalist - to professional, larger-format, presentations by dedicated environmental correspondents. Not all such environmental correspondents, however, have natural-history expertise or even a scientific background. Yorkshire's Michael Clegg was a man who had a life-long love of nature wedded to a desire to communicate that passion. He moved from a secure position in the museum world (with a journalistic sideline) to become a freelance newspaper journalist and (subsequently) commentator on radio and television dealing with, and campaigning on, environmental issues full-time. As such, he exemplified the transition in how natural history coverage in the media evolved in the final decades of the twentieth century reflecting modern concerns about biodiversity, conservation, pollution and sustainable development. © The Society for the History of Natural History. Source


Moore P.G.,32 Marine Parade
Archives of Natural History | Year: 2015

In spite of the prodigious output of books on natural history for the popular market that emanated from William Percival Westell during the first half of the twentieth century, little has been written in his appreciation save for one brief obituary. Estimated to have sold some half million copies of his works - the products of some 37 publishers - he must have had a great impact on the public's appreciation of natural history.Aself-educated naturalist, he strove to make his publications accessible to all by eschewing technical language. A native of Hertfordshire, living initially in St Albans and latterly in Letchworth Garden City, he served as curator of Letchworth Museum for three decades. This article expands on his autobiography and obituary: examining his oeuvre, ethics and contacts in order to set his achievements in a wider context than has been done hitherto. A bibliography of his natural history books is presented. © The Society for the History of Natural History. Source


Three letters from the Sheina Marshall archive at the former University Marine Biological Station Millport (UMBSM) reveal the pivotal significance of Sheina Marshall's father, Dr John Nairn Marshall, behind the scheme planned by Glasgow University's Regius Professor of Zoology, John Graham Kerr. He proposed to build an alternative marine station facility on Cumbrae's adjacent island of Bute in the Firth of Clyde in the early years of the twentieth century to cater predominantly for marine researchers. © The Society for the History of Natural History. Source


As the BBC's "Hut Man", Gilbert Dempster Fisher was a pioneer of radio broadcasting for children in Scotland in the 1940s and 1950s. Also a successful author of children's books on natural history, he based both his writings and his broadcasts on his observations of the wildlife that surrounded his isolated hut near Lochwinnoch, Renfrewshire. Devoted to pedagogy, he established "The Hut-Man's Club" for children in the late 1930s and was foremost in the encouragement of natural history in Scottish schools. He also wrote poetry for young children and, from 1947 to 1950, he produced The children's magazine. During the last decade of his "Hut life" he was engaged by Scottish local education authorities to speak in schools and residential camps about nature study, captivating children with his "Hut Man" tales. He also engaged with teachers to help them deliver natural history lessons, writing a comprehensive guide book on the subject. The teacher-training authorities, however, failed to capitalize on his vision of nature study within the school curriculum. Disillusioned by their intransigence and faced with local environmental degradation of the Hut Country and inappropriate housing development locally, he moved east. In 1956 he was appointed Director-Secretary of the Royal Zoological Society of Scotland administering Edinburgh Zoo. This paper concentrates on his "Hut Man" career as an author and radio presenter; the communication of natural history being its central theme, at a time when radio was becoming a popular medium of mass communication. © The Society for the History of Natural History. Source

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