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Nasioudis D.,401 Army General Hospital | Palaiodimos L.,Yeshiva University | Dagiasis M.,Naval Hospital of Athens | Katsarou A.,251 Hellenic Air Force Hospital
Military Medical Research | Year: 2015

Background: Military medicine cadets undergo strenuous military training alongside demanding medical studies. This stressful and complex educational environment can lead to the emergence of depressive symptoms. We investigated the prevalence of depressive symptoms in a cohort of military medicine cadets. Methods: We conducted a descriptive questionnaire-based cross-sectional study among Greek military medicine cadets in the undergraduate program of the Hellenic Military School of Combat Support Officers. The Greek translation of the Zung self-rating depression scale questionnaire was used to screen for the presence of depressive symptoms. In addition, demographic, academic and dietary information was collected. The Shapiro-Wilk test of normality, Pearson correlation test, Chi-square test, t-test and Mann Whitney U test were employed for statistical analysis. Results: We enrolled 55 female and 91 male military medicine cadets with a mean age of 19.84 years (SD=0.99). The mean Zung crude score was 43.32 (SD=4.55): 42.8 (SD=4.43) for female cadets and 43.64 (SD=4.6) for male cadets. Cadets were further subdivided into low and high risk groups for the presence of depressive symptoms. We identified 57 (39 %) cadets with a total Zung crude score of 45 or above: 21 females and 36 males. Statistical analysis did not reveal any significant differences between the two groups based on gender, year of training, academic performance, alcohol consumption, smoking status, vitamin supplementation, dietary habits or BMI. Conclusions: We report a high prevalence of depressive symptoms in a cohort of military medicine cadets that underscores the need for effective screening and appropriate and timely interventions. We did not identify any related risk factors. Military medicine cadets are exposed to a challenging military and medical training environment, and thus represent a group at risk for development of depression. © 2015 Nasioudis et al.


PubMed | Yeshiva University, Naval Hospital of Athens, 251 Hellenic Air Force Hospital and 401 Army General Hospital
Type: | Journal: Military Medical Research | Year: 2015

Military medicine cadets undergo strenuous military training alongside demanding medical studies. This stressful and complex educational environment can lead to the emergence of depressive symptoms. We investigated the prevalence of depressive symptoms in a cohort of military medicine cadets.We conducted a descriptive questionnaire-based cross-sectional study among Greek military medicine cadets in the undergraduate program of the Hellenic Military School of Combat Support Officers. The Greek translation of the Zung self-rating depression scale questionnaire was used to screen for the presence of depressive symptoms. In addition, demographic, academic and dietary information was collected. The Shapiro-Wilk test of normality, Pearson correlation test, Chi-square test, t-test and Mann Whitney U test were employed for statistical analysis.We enrolled 55 female and 91 male military medicine cadets with a mean age of 19.84years (SD=0.99). The mean Zung crude score was 43.32 (SD=4.55): 42.8 (SD=4.43) for female cadets and 43.64 (SD=4.6) for male cadets. Cadets were further subdivided into low and high risk groups for the presence of depressive symptoms. We identified 57 (39%) cadets with a total Zung crude score of 45 or above: 21 females and 36 males. Statistical analysis did not reveal any significant differences between the two groups based on gender, year of training, academic performance, alcohol consumption, smoking status, vitamin supplementation, dietary habits or BMI.We report a high prevalence of depressive symptoms in a cohort of military medicine cadets that underscores the need for effective screening and appropriate and timely interventions. We did not identify any related risk factors. Military medicine cadets are exposed to a challenging military and medical training environment, and thus represent a group at risk for development of depression.


PubMed | Hellenic Gymnastics Federation Medical Team, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Hellenic Army Academy and 251 Hellenic Air Force Hospital
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Shoulder & elbow | Year: 2016

We report the case of a 16-year-old elite gymnast who presented with recurring pain in the left shoulder after training. The athlete recalled an injury to the shoulder 2 years ago. Clinically a localized tenderness to the anterior shoulder and loss of strength and range of motion was noted. Imaging investigation suggested a neglected lesser tuberosity avulsion. The athlete was treated with open excision of the deformed tuberosity and direct repair of the subscapularis to the humeral head. Following a careful postoperative rehabilitation protocol the athlete was able to return to unrestricted gymnastics after 6 months. After surgery the athlete followed a intense rehabilitation program that allowed him to return to sports at 6 months. At 5-years follow-up, the athlete was asymptomatic and competing at an international level. Avulsion fractures of the lesser tuberosity are extremely rare injuries with significant shoulder disability if left untreated. Anatomic repair can yield excellent results, even in neglected cases.


Sakorafas G.H.,National and Kapodistrian University of Athens | Kokkoris P.,251 Hellenic Air Force Hospital | Farley D.R.,Mayo Medical School
Surgical Oncology | Year: 2010

Primary thyroid lymphomas (PTL) are very rare tumors, typically presentingas a rapidly enlarging, painless thyroid mass, which may cause pressure symptoms of the aerodigestive tract. Preoperative diagnosis can be established by using modern imaging methods (mainly ultrasonography) and FNA with immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. Open (surgical) biopsy may be indicated to confirm the diagnosis and identify the subtype of PTL. Therapeutic strategies are distinct from other thyroid malignancies, and include local therapy alone (surgery or radiotherapy or surgery plus radiotherapy) or - most commonly - combined multimodality treatment (mainly chemoradiation therapy). Management should be tailored to the individual patient; treatment-related morbidity should be taken into account. A high index of suspicion from the part of the clinician is required to achieve early diagnosis and prompt treatment of this potentially curable thyroid malignancy. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Zouros E.,251 Hellenic Air Force Hospital | Oikonomou D.,251 Hellenic Air Force Hospital | Theoharis G.,251 Hellenic Air Force Hospital | Bantias C.,251 Hellenic Air Force Hospital | Papadimitropoulos K.,251 Hellenic Air Force Hospital
Journal of Emergency Medicine | Year: 2014

Background Ingesting a foreign body (FB) is not an uncommon occurrence. Most pass through the gastrointestinal (GI) tract uneventfully and rarely cause complications. However, long, sharp, slender, and hard objects such as fish bones, chicken bones, and toothpicks may lead to perforation of the GI tract, which is a potentially life-threatening complication.Case Report We report the case of a 50-year-old woman who presented to the Emergency Department of our hospital complaining of right lower quadrant abdominal pain of 2 days' duration. Ultrasound imaging and computed tomography scan demonstrated the presence of a foreign body protruding from the lateral cecal wall and surrounded by an area of inflammation. The patient was taken to the operating room, where a toothpick was found to have perforated the cecum. The FB was removed and the defect of the intestinal wall was closed using a TA linear stapler (Covidien, Mansfield, MA). The patient was discharged on the 8th postoperative day. We also conducted a literature search for reports on injuries caused by ingested FBs.Why Should an Emergency Physician be Aware of This? Perforation of the GI tract by an ingested FB in the adult population is most commonly secondary to accidental ingestion. Patients rarely recall the episode of the ingestion, or may remember the incident only after a diagnosis is made. We present this case to increase awareness of the diagnosis. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.


Sakorafas G.H.,251 Hellenic Air Force Hospital
World Journal of Surgery | Year: 2010

Thyroid diseases (mainly goiter) have been recognized for more than 3500 years. Knowledge of the nature of these diseases was, of course, limited at that time. Thyroid surgery was conceived by the ancients, but it was limited to rare attempts to remove part of an enlarged thyroid gland in cases of impending death by suffocation or, in very rare cases, of a suppurating thyroid. Like other fields of surgery, thyroid surgery was limited by many problems: the lack of anesthesia and antisepsis, the need for appropriate instruments, mainly artery forceps (many deaths after thyroid surgery were due to severe postoperative hemorrhage or infection). Much of the progress in thyroid surgery occurred in Europe during the second half of the 19th century. During the first half of the 20th century, the evolution of thyroid surgery accelerated significantly, based on the contributions of pioneering European and American surgeons. The present status of thyroid surgery was established during the last quarter of the 20th century, when modern imaging methods and technological advances (including progress in applied molecular biology) brought thyroid surgery into the new millennium. © 2010 Société Internationale de Chirurgie.


PubMed | 251 Hellenic Air Force Hospital
Type: | Journal: Case reports in vascular medicine | Year: 2015

Iatrogenic aortic injuries are rare and well-recognized complications of a variety of procedures, including spinal surgery. The placement of pedicle screws is sometimes associated with devastating consequences. Aortic perforation with rapid hematoma formation and delayed aortic trauma leading to pseudoaneurysm formation have been described in the literature. A case describing a significant time interval between iatrogenic aortic injury and diagnosis in the absence of pseudoaneurysm formation is described in this paper and, according to our knowledge, is unique in the literature. The aortic injury was successfully treated, selecting the appropriate graft and, as a consequence, normal spinal cord blood flow was achieved.


PubMed | 251 Hellenic Air Force Hospital
Type: Journal Article | Journal: International angiology : a journal of the International Union of Angiology | Year: 2016

Percutaneous endovascular aneurysm repair (p-EVAR), has been widely spread based on the recent improvements in stent-graft technology and mainly in delivery system downsizing. Aim of this study is to investigate the safety and efficacy of fascia suture technique (FST) in p-EVAR during the short and mid-term follow-up (FU).Between April 2011 and July 2013, 64 consecutive patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm were enrolled in a prospective single center registry. Fifty-four patients were eligible for elective p-EVAR assisted by the fascia suture technique. Patients were prospectively followed with duplex scan 24 hours and 30 days postoperatively and with CTA annually thereafter. Femoral haematoma, pseudoaneurysm and limb ischaemia were the primary outcomes.The study investigated 103 femoral arteries reconstructions using the FST. Intraoperatively, one patient was diagnosed with limb ischaemia treated with open repair. During the short-term, 4 (3.8%) pseudoaneurysms were diagnosed, treated with open (2) or endovascular (2) repair. During mid-term 43 patients (85 arteries, 82.6%) underwent CTA. Eighteen (17.4%) patients were lost at FU. At 12 months CTA two pseudoaneurysms (2.35%) were detected, treated with open repair.The FST seems safe and effective for femoral reconstruction after p-EVAR. Complications are comparable to closure devices and to conventional repair.


Anagnostopoulos G.,251 Hellenic Air Force Hospital | Sakorafas G.H.,251 Hellenic Air Force Hospital | Kostopoulos P.,251 Hellenic Air Force Hospital | Margantinis G.,251 Hellenic Air Force Hospital | And 2 more authors.
European Journal of Cancer Care | Year: 2010

Early gastric cancer (EGC) is defined as an adenocarcinoma confined to the gastric mucosa or submucosa, regardless of the presence of lymph node metastases. Early gastric cancer carries an excellent prognosis, with a 5-year survival rate at least 85% in most series. However, there are rare cases where distant metastases exist. Bone metastases are rare in gastric cancer; osteoblastic bone metastases are even rarer. We report a patient with EGC (mucosal) and synchronous osteosclerotic bone metastasis. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of submucosal EGC with synchronous bone metastases. The patient was operated and he received adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy. He died 18 months after gastric surgery from generalized disease. © 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.


PubMed | 251 Hellenic Air Force Hospital
Type: Historical Article | Journal: World journal of surgery | Year: 2010

Thyroid diseases (mainly goiter) have been recognized for more than 3500 years. Knowledge of the nature of these diseases was, of course, limited at that time. Thyroid surgery was conceived by the ancients, but it was limited to rare attempts to remove part of an enlarged thyroid gland in cases of impending death by suffocation or, in very rare cases, of a suppurating thyroid. Like other fields of surgery, thyroid surgery was limited by many problems: the lack of anesthesia and antisepsis, the need for appropriate instruments, mainly artery forceps (many deaths after thyroid surgery were due to severe postoperative hemorrhage or infection). Much of the progress in thyroid surgery occurred in Europe during the second half of the 19th century. During the first half of the 20th century, the evolution of thyroid surgery accelerated significantly, based on the contributions of pioneering European and American surgeons. The present status of thyroid surgery was established during the last quarter of the 20th century, when modern imaging methods and technological advances (including progress in applied molecular biology) brought thyroid surgery into the new millennium.

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