251 Air Force Hospital

Athens, Greece

251 Air Force Hospital

Athens, Greece

Time filter

Source Type

Kararizou E.,National and Kapodistrian University of Athens | Naoumis D.,251 Air Force Hospital | Gkiatas K.,251 Air Force Hospital | Kapaki E.,National and Kapodistrian University of Athens | Vassilopoulos D.,National and Kapodistrian University of Athens
Journal of Headache and Pain | Year: 2010

We describe a case which initially presented as persistent and untreatable probable migraine, which was subsequently diagnosed as neurosyphilis during the clinical evaluation. All symptoms regressed after appropriate treatment. We suggest that the possibility of neurosyphilis should be taken into account in the differential diagnosis of a persistent headache which does not respond to medication. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.


Kararizou E.,National and Kapodistrian University of Athens | Anagnostou E.,National and Kapodistrian University of Athens | Paraskevas G.P.,National and Kapodistrian University of Athens | Vassilopoulou S.D.,National and Kapodistrian University of Athens | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Headache and Pain | Year: 2011

Headache related to airplane flights is rare. We describe a 37-year-old female patient with multiple intense, jabbing headache episodes over the last 3 years that occur exclusively during airplane flights. The pain manifests during take-off and landing, and is located always in the left retro-orbital and frontotemporal area. It is occasionally accompanied by dizziness, but no additional symptoms occur. Pain intensity diminishes and disappears after 15-20 min. Apart from occasional dizziness, no other symptoms occur. The patient has a history of tension-type headache and polycystic ovaries. Blood tests and imaging revealed no abnormalities. Here, we present the first case in Greece. We review the current literature on this rare syndrome and discuss on possible pathophysiology and the investigation of possible co-factors such as anxiety and depression. © The Author(s) 2011.


Karampeazis A.,417 NIMTS Veterans Hospital | Voutsina A.,University of CreteCrete | Souglakos J.,University of CreteCrete | Souglakos J.,University of Crete | And 16 more authors.
Cancer | Year: 2013

BACKGROUND In this superiority study, pemetrexed was compared with erlotinib in pre-treated patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). METHODS Patients with stage IIIB/IV NSCLC who progressed after first-line or second-line treatment were randomized to receive either pemetrexed or erlotinib. In total, 21.7% of patients in the pemetrexed arm and 23.5% of patients in the erlotinib arm had squamous cell histology, and treatment was third line in 39.2% and 46.4% of patients, respectively. The primary study endpoint was time to tumor progression (TTP). Epidermal growth factor receptor/v-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (EGFR/KRAS) mutation status also was investigated. RESULTS There was no difference in terms of the TTP (P =.195), the objective response rate (P =.469), or overall survival (P =.986) between the 2 treatment arms. In patients who had squamous cell histology, erlotinib resulted in a superior TTP compared with pemetrexed (4.1 months vs 2.5 months, respectively; P =.006). The incidence of grade 3 and 4 neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, and asthenia was significantly higher in the pemetrexed arm, whereas the incidence of grade 3 and 4 skin rash was higher in the erlotinib arm. CONCLUSIONS Both pemetrexed and erlotinib had comparable efficacy in pre-treated patients with metastatic NSCLC, and the current results indicated that genotyping of tumor cells may have an important effect on treatment efficacy. © 2013 American Cancer Society.


Naoumis D.,251 Air Force Hospital | Gkiatas K.,251 Air Force Hospital | Kararizos G.,251 Air Force Hospital | Mitsonis C.,National and Kapodistrian University of Athens | Kararizou E.,National and Kapodistrian University of Athens
Aviation Space and Environmental Medicine | Year: 2010

This study describes an unusual case of a military pilot with sacral meningocele that contained cerebrospinal fluid and presented as episodes of gluteal neuralgia during flight. The patient, a 38-yr-old male pilot, had complained of a dull and mild low lumbar pain over the previous 10 mo. These pains were exacerbated and radiated to the left gluteal region during flight. The patient's history, clinical examination, imaging findings, and treatment are reported. CT and MRI imaging revealed an unusual case of sacral meningocele (2.2 cm x 3.6 cm x 5.8 cm). These lesions can progress steadily in size, leading to worsening symptoms and potentially requiring surgical management. However, surgery is not indicated for stable and asymptomatic lesions not associated with tumors. In our case, tactical monitoring was suggested, since no other symptoms appeared. There are currently no other reported cases involving pilots, so an individual approach to treatment should be taken in accordance with their military health service, the potential risk factors, and depending on the level of acceleration experienced. We discuss the pathogenesis, the clinical and radiological findings of this rare condition, and note that a spinal cyst is of special interest when occurring in pilots since they are exposed to intense accelerations and spinal strain. Copyright © by the Aerospace Medical Association.


Mountzios G.,251 Air Force Hospital | Emmanouilidis C.,Diabalkanikon Hospital | Vardakis N.,University of Crete | Kontopodis E.,University of Crete | And 6 more authors.
Lung Cancer | Year: 2012

Introduction: Therapeutic options for patients with relapsed, chemo-resistant small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) are limited. Since paclitaxel has demonstrated single-agent activity in the second-line setting of SCLC and angiogenesis seems to play an important role in the pathogenesis of the disease, a phase II trial was conducted in order to evaluate the efficacy and the tolerance of their combination in patients with relapsed, chemo-resistant SCLC. Patients and methods: Patients with an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status of 0-2 who experienced relapse within 3 months after completion of 1st line chemotherapy for SCLC were eligible. Patients were treated with paclitaxel (90mg/m 2, days 1, 8 and 15) along with bevacizumab (10mg per kg of body weight, days 1 and 15) in cycles of 28 days. Results: Thirty patients (male/female: 27/3) with a median age of 64 years and ECOG performance status 0/1/2: 2/25/3 were enrolled. Nineteen patients (63.3%) had received at least two lines of prior treatment, 17 (56.7%) had undergone prior radiotherapy and nine (30%) had brain metastases at the time of study entry. The overall objective response rate was 20% (95% CI: 5.69-34.31%), including one complete remission, whereas the disease control rate was 36.7%. The median duration of response was 2.5. months (range, 1.5-5.7), the median progression-free survival 2.7 months (range, 0.5-9.2) and the median overall survival 6.3 months (range, 0.5-17.9). Grades 3 and 4 toxicities were limited in neutropenia, diarrhea and fatigue. There was one case of non-fatal pulmonary embolism. Conclusions: The combination of paclitaxel with bevacizumab was feasible and active in this poor prognosis and heavily pretreated population of patients with advanced, chemoresistant SCLC, representing a valid therapeutic alternative which merits further evaluation. © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.


Kentepozidis N.,251 Air Force Hospital | Soultati A.,251 Air Force Hospital | Giassas S.,IASO General Hospital | Vardakis N.,University General Hospital of Heraklion | And 6 more authors.
Cancer Chemotherapy and Pharmacology | Year: 2012

Introduction: To evaluate the efficacy and tolerance of biweekly paclitaxel and carboplatin combination in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer. Patients and methods: Patients were treated with paclitaxel at the dose of 135 mg/m 2 followed by carboplatin AUC 3 on day 1 every 2 weeks in cycles of 28 days. Results: Thirty-eight patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer were enrolled, and all of them had received frontline chemotherapy with docetaxel and prednisone, while 24 (63.2 %) had received 2 or more prior chemotherapy regimens. In an intention-to-treatment analysis, a clinical and/or biochemical response (>50 % decline) was observed in 10 patients (26.3 %; 95 % CI, 12.3-40.3 %), stable disease in 13 (34.2 %) and progressive disease in 15 (39.5 %). The median duration of response was 6.1 months (range, 1.0-9.8), the median time to tumor progression (TTP) 3.6 months (95 % CI, 2.1-5.2) and the median overall survival 9.9 months (95 % CI, 6.2-13.6). The probability for 1-year survival was 43 %. Grade 3 and 4 neutropenia was observed in three (7.9 %) and nine (23.7 %) patients, respectively. Conclusion: The biweekly administration of paclitaxel/carboplatin regimen in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer is an active and well-tolerated regimen which merits to be further evaluated in the context of salvage treatment. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.


Kentepozidis N.,Hellenic Oncology Research Group HORG | Kentepozidis N.,251 Air Force Hospital | Kotsakis A.,Hellenic Oncology Research Group HORG | Soultati A.,Hellenic Oncology Research Group HORG | And 9 more authors.
Cancer Chemotherapy and Pharmacology | Year: 2013

Background: The docetaxel/cisplatin (DC) combination is an active regimen against advanced/metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and bevacizumab (B) improves the efficacy of frontline chemotherapy. This phase II study was designed in order to explore the efficacy and safety of DCB regiment in this setting. Methods: Chemotherapy-naïve patients (n = 48) with measurable, histologically confirmed non-squamous, IIIB (wet)/IV NSCLC, and PS 0-2 were eligible. Patients received D (75 mg/m2 IV), C (80 mg/m2 IV), and B (15 mg/kg IV) every 3 weeks. Maintenance of bevacizumab was not mandatory. Results: Complete and partial responses were achieved in two (4.2 %) and 14 (29.2 %) patients, respectively [overall response rate: 33.3 %; 95 % CI = 20.0-46.7 %], whereas stable disease was documented in 14 [disease control rate = 62.5 %; 95 % CI = 48.8-76.2 %]. The median progression-free survival was 4.4 months and the median overall survival 13.3 months. Treatment-related grade 3 or 4 hematologic adverse events were leukopenia, neutropenia, and anemia in 8.4, 18.7, and 2.1 % of the patients, respectively. Febrile neutropenia occurred in three (6.3 %) patients. Bleeding was documented in 4 % of the patients, thrombotic episodes in 8 %, and proteinuria in 3 %. There was one treatment-related death. Conclusions: Frontline DCB in patients with advanced non-squamous NSCLC is an active regimen with manageable toxicity and merits to be further investigated. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


PubMed | 251 Air Force Hospital
Type: Clinical Trial, Phase II | Journal: Lung cancer (Amsterdam, Netherlands) | Year: 2012

Therapeutic options for patients with relapsed, chemo-resistant small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) are limited. Since paclitaxel has demonstrated single-agent activity in the second-line setting of SCLC and angiogenesis seems to play an important role in the pathogenesis of the disease, a phase II trial was conducted in order to evaluate the efficacy and the tolerance of their combination in patients with relapsed, chemo-resistant SCLC.Patients with an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status of 0-2 who experienced relapse within 3 months after completion of 1st line chemotherapy for SCLC were eligible. Patients were treated with paclitaxel (90 mg/m(2), days 1, 8 and 15) along with bevacizumab (10mg per kg of body weight, days 1 and 15) in cycles of 28 days.Thirty patients (male/female: 27/3) with a median age of 64 years and ECOG performance status 0/1/2: 2/25/3 were enrolled. Nineteen patients (63.3%) had received at least two lines of prior treatment, 17 (56.7%) had undergone prior radiotherapy and nine (30%) had brain metastases at the time of study entry. The overall objective response rate was 20% (95% CI: 5.69-34.31%), including one complete remission, whereas the disease control rate was 36.7%. The median duration of response was 2.5 months (range, 1.5-5.7), the median progression-free survival 2.7 months (range, 0.5-9.2) and the median overall survival 6.3 months (range, 0.5-17.9). Grades 3 and 4 toxicities were limited in neutropenia, diarrhea and fatigue. There was one case of non-fatal pulmonary embolism.The combination of paclitaxel with bevacizumab was feasible and active in this poor prognosis and heavily pretreated population of patients with advanced, chemoresistant SCLC, representing a valid therapeutic alternative which merits further evaluation.


PubMed | 251 Air Force Hospital
Type: Case Reports | Journal: Aviation, space, and environmental medicine | Year: 2010

This study describes an unusual case of a military pilot with sacral meningocele that contained cerebrospinal fluid and presented as episodes of gluteal neuralgia during flight. The patient, a 38-yr-old male pilot, had complained of a dull and mild low lumbar pain over the previous 10 mo. These pains were exacerbated and radiated to the left gluteal region during flight. The patients history, clinical examination, imaging findings, and treatment are reported. CT and MRI imaging revealed an unusual case of sacral meningocele (2.2 cm x 3.6 cm X 5.8 cm). These lesions can progress steadily in size, leading to worsening symptoms and potentially requiring surgical management. However, surgery is not indicated for stable and asymptomatic lesions not associated with tumors. In our case, tactical monitoring was suggested, since no other symptoms appeared. There are currently no other reported cases involving pilots, so an individual approach to treatment should be taken in accordance with their military health service, the potential, risk factors, and depending on the level of acceleration experienced. We discuss the pathogenesis, the clinical and radiological findings of this rare condition, and note that a spinal cyst is of special interest when occurring in pilots since they are exposed to intense accelerations and spinal strain.


PubMed | 251 Air Force Hospital
Type: Clinical Trial, Phase II | Journal: Cancer chemotherapy and pharmacology | Year: 2012

To evaluate the efficacy and tolerance of biweekly paclitaxel and carboplatin combination in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer.Patients were treated with paclitaxel at the dose of 135 mg/m(2) followed by carboplatin AUC 3 on day 1 every 2 weeks in cycles of 28 days.Thirty-eight patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer were enrolled, and all of them had received frontline chemotherapy with docetaxel and prednisone, while 24 (63.2 %) had received 2 or more prior chemotherapy regimens. In an intention-to-treatment analysis, a clinical and/or biochemical response (>50 % decline) was observed in 10 patients (26.3 %; 95 % CI, 12.3-40.3 %), stable disease in 13 (34.2 %) and progressive disease in 15 (39.5 %). The median duration of response was 6.1 months (range, 1.0-9.8), the median time to tumor progression (TTP) 3.6 months (95 % CI, 2.1-5.2) and the median overall survival 9.9 months (95 % CI, 6.2-13.6). The probability for 1-year survival was 43 %. Grade 3 and 4 neutropenia was observed in three (7.9 %) and nine (23.7 %) patients, respectively.The biweekly administration of paclitaxel/carboplatin regimen in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer is an active and well-tolerated regimen which merits to be further evaluated in the context of salvage treatment.

Loading 251 Air Force Hospital collaborators
Loading 251 Air Force Hospital collaborators