1st Field Unit

Milano, Italy

1st Field Unit

Milano, Italy

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Guidotti M.,CNR Institute of Molecular Science and Technologies | Guidotti M.,1st Field Unit | Ranghieri M.C.,1st Field Unit | Carniato F.,University of Piemonte Orientale | Bisio C.,University of Piemonte Orientale
NATO Science for Peace and Security Series B: Physics and Biophysics | Year: 2013

Absorption and destruction of chemical and biological (CBRN) hazardous agents can be required on the field (decontamination after warfare or terrorist use) as well as in laboratories, pilot plants and chemical agent destruction sites (abatement of CBRN weapons). Inorganic metal oxides, in all forms and formulations, constitute a large class of materials that are suitable for such purposes. They are robust under usual working conditions, rich in specific surface sorption sites, active in the degradation of hazardous compounds via catalytic or photocatalytic mechanisms and, in most cases, relatively cheap. In addition, thanks to the recent advances in the nanosciences, structured nanosized inorganic solids show promising performances because of their high activity and selectivity, even at very low catalyst to toxic agent ratios. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.


Guidotti M.,CNR Institute of Molecular Science and Technologies | Evangelisti C.,CNR Institute of Molecular Science and Technologies | Rossodivita A.,University of Milan | Ranghieri M.C.,1st Field Unit
NATO Science for Peace and Security Series A: Chemistry and Biology | Year: 2014

The destruction of chemical hazardous agents can be required on the fi eld, for decontamination after an accidental or deliberate release, as well as in laboratories, pilot plants and chemical agent destruction sites, for abatement of stockpiled chemical weapons. Nanostructured inorganic metal oxides and/or metal particles, in all forms and formulations, constitute a large class of materials that are suitable for such purposes. They are robust, rich in specifi c surface sorption sites, active in the degradation of hazardous compounds via catalytic or photocatalytic mechanisms and, in most cases, relatively cheap. Such nanosystems show promising performances in terms of activity and selectivity, even at very low catalyst to toxic agent ratios. It is thus possible to move from conventional stoichiometric destruction to catalytic chemical decontamination of hazardous compounds. However, the recent ever-increasing concerns about the consequences on human health and environment of nanosized inorganic systems must induce a careful investigation about their toxicological and pathogenic impact on living organisms. © Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014.


Guidotti M.,CNR Institute of Molecular Science and Technologies | Ranghieri M.C.,1st Field Unit
NATO Science for Peace and Security Series A: Chemistry and Biology | Year: 2012

In the field of non-conventional CBRN weapons, the recent rapid development of nanotechnology and catalysis over nanosized solids provides innovative tools for the detection, protection and decontamination against these threats. By improving the efficiency of the countermeasures and by minimizing the negative effects of a deliberate use of CBRN agents, the practical application of the new technologies will readily represent a step forward in lowering the vulnerability of the civilian populations and in preventing the use of mass destruction weapons by terrorist groups or by 'rogue states' supporting terrorists' activity. In such scenario, some relevant examples of nanosystems applied to the defense from non-conventional warfare agents will be here presented and commented. The key role of nanotechnology and heterogeneous catalysis for a multidisciplinary approach in counteracting CBRN threats will be highlighted too. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

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