NM, United States
NM, United States

Time filter

Source Type

Forrestal M.J.,1805 Newton Pl | Warren T.L.,3804 Shenandoah Pl | Borvik T.,Norwegian University of Science and Technology
Conference Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Mechanics Series | Year: 2013

We conducted an experimental analytical study to understand the mechanisms and dominant parameters for 7.62 mm APM2 bullets that perforate 6082-T651 aluminum plates at oblique impacts. Tests were conducted with the full bullet and the hard core only to show that the hard core dominates the perforation process. Models show good agreement with measured residual and ballistic-limit velocities. © The Society for Experimental Mechanics, Inc. 2013.


Borvik T.,Norwegian University of Science and Technology | Borvik T.,Norwegian Defence Estates Agency | Forrestal M.J.,1805 Newton Pl | Warren T.L.,3804 Shenandoah Pl
Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Mechanics, Inc. | Year: 2010

We conducted an experimental and analytical study to understand the mechanisms and dominant parameters for ogive-nose rods and 7.62 mm APM2 bullets that perforate 5083-H116 aluminum armor plates. The 20-mm-diameter, 95-mm-long, ogive-nose, 197 g, hard steel rods were launched with a gas gun to striking velocities between 230-370 m/s. The 7.62-mm-diameter, 10.7 g, APM2 bullet consists of a brass jacket, lead filler, and a 5.25 g, ogivenose, hard steel core. The brass and lead were stripped from the APM2 bullets by the targets, so we conducted ballistic experiments with both the APM2 bullets and only the hard steel cores. These projectiles were fired from a rifle to striking velocities between 480-950 m/s. Targets were 20, 40, and 60-mm-thick, where the 40 and 60-mm-thick targets were made up of layered 20-mm-thick plates in contact with each other. The measured ballistic-limit velocities for the APM2 bullets were 4, 6, and 12% smaller than that for the hard steel cores for the 20, 40, and 60-mm-thick targets, respectively. Thus, the brass jacket and lead filler had a relatively small effect on the perforation process. In addition, we conducted large strain, compression tests on the 5083-H116 aluminum plate material for input to perforation equations derived from a cavity-expansion model for the ogive-nose rods and steel core projectiles. Predictions for the rod and hard steel core projectiles are shown to be in good agreement with measured ballistic-limit and residual velocity data. These experimental results and perforation equations display the dominant problem parameters. © Society for Experimental Mechanics 2009.


Warren T.L.,3804 Shenandoah Pl | Forrestal M.J.,1805 Newton Pl
Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Mechanics, Inc. | Year: 2010

We present equations that show the effect of radial inertia for incompressible samples that are in dynamic force equilibrium during the split Hopkinson pressure bar test or Kolsky bar test. For steel samples the radial inertia effect can be neglected; however, radial inertia can be important for very soft materials. © Society for Experimental Mechanics 2009.

Loading 1805 Newton Pl collaborators
Loading 1805 Newton Pl collaborators