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Westlake Village, CA, United States

Hajdu S.I.,1759 Drumcliff Court
Cancer | Year: 2011

Events that took place in medicine during the 15th, 16th, and 17th centuries signaled the end of the Dark Ages. The Renaissance movement, spreading from Italy across Europe, ended the religious and public prohibitions that had prevented progress in medicine. Pioneer physicians and surgeons who gave their attention to discoveries in anatomy, physiology, and chemistry established the foundations for tumor pathology, surgical oncology, and medical oncology. This review is a summary of their accomplishments. Copyright © 2010 American Cancer Society. Source


Hajdu S.I.,1759 Drumcliff Court
Cancer | Year: 2010

Antonio Benivieni, an Italian physician, Theophilus Boneti, a Swiss physician, and Giovanni Battista Mogagni, an Italian physician, pioneered postmortem examination for finding hidden causes of diseases. By correlating the results of their clinical and postmortem examinations, they established the foundation of anatomic pathology, clinical medicine, and oncology. © 2010 American Cancer Society. Source


Hajdu S.I.,1759 Drumcliff Court
Cancer | Year: 2012

In the second half of the 19th century, most cancer patients were cared for by surgeons who exerted ascesis and limited their operations to 1 or 2 specific areas. To assist surgeons and other physicians in caring for their patients, pathologists described newly discovered entities, refined the microscopic classification of tumors, and introduced the grading of cancers. The discoveries of Rontgen and the Curies revolutionized the diagnosis and treatment of cancers. The search for the cause of cancers extended to infectious organisms, chemicals, and radioactive materials. The 50 years covered in this review formed the groundwork for the coordinated, specialized care of cancer patients at institutions dedicated to render the most promising treatment. Copyright © 2012 American Cancer Society. Source


Hajdu S.I.,1759 Drumcliff Court
Cancer | Year: 2012

In the early 19th century, microscopy in pathology replaced gross descriptive pathology of the 18th century. Cells became known as the most important and distinct elements of benign and cancerous tissues. Thus, by the mid-1800s, a solid foundation had been laid for microscopy, and surgeons recognized that microscopic diagnosis by pathologists merited attention. In due course, preoperative microscopic diagnoses and classification of cancers in biopsy specimens were incorporated into choosing the most fitting surgical operation. © 2011 American Cancer Society. Source

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