Myrtle Grove, FL, United States
Myrtle Grove, FL, United States

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Dennis D.S.,1105 Myrtle Wood Drive | Lavigne R.J.,South Australia Museum | Lavigne R.J.,University of Wyoming | Dennis J.G.,P.O. Box 861161
Journal of the Entomological Research Society | Year: 2012

There are many references on the Internet and in the published literature to robber flies preying upon spiders. However, an evaluation of available data summarized in the Asilidae Predator-Prey Database reveals that spiders make up only a small percentage of the robber fly diet (less than 1% of approximately 58,000 prey listed in the Database). The types of spider chosen as prey are discussed and examined in relation to robber fly classification. Robber fly methods of capturing spiders are examined and comments about spiders preying upon robber flies are provided.


Dennis D.S.,1105 Myrtle Wood Drive | Barnes J.K.,University of Arkansas | Knutson L.,Salita degli Albito 29
Zootaxa | Year: 2013

Recent publications on the immature stages of robber flies (Asilidae) are reviewed and listed for the 14 currently recognized subfamilies (Asilinae, Bathypogoninae, Brachyrhopalinae, Dasypogoninae, Dioctriinae, Laphriinae, Leptogastrinae, Ommatiinae, Phellinae, Stenopogoninae, Stichopogoninae, Tillobromatinae, Trigonomiminae, and Willistonininae). For the Phellinae there are only limited data on the pupal cases, and for the Tillobromatinae there are only limited data on the eggs (potential oviposition site in soil) and pupal cases. The recent literature is compared with pertinent pre-1972 publications. Copyright © 2013 Magnolia Press.


Dennis D.S.,1105 Myrtle Wood Drive | Barnes J.K.,University of Arkansas
Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington | Year: 2012

The pupal case of the Palearctic robber fly Andrenosoma atrum (Linnaeus) is described, illustrated, and compared with those of Andrenosoma albopilosum Villeneuve and Andrenosoma bayardi Séguy. A key to the pupal cases of these three species is provided.


Dennis D.S.,1105 Myrtle Wood Drive
Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington | Year: 2015

The oviposition, eggs, emergence of first instar larvae, and larvae of Mallophora orcina (Wiedemann, 1828) are described and compared with those of Mallophora spp., Megaphorus spp., and other species of robber flies. Oviposition occurred on vegetation 1-3 m above the ground with approximately 188-323 eggs deposited in layers in a chalky-white albumin. The eggs are elongate and initially glistening white. They turn a dark metallic color on the end where larvae emerge from. Upon emergence the larvae drop to the ground where they bury themselves in the soil. Larvae are shiny white, dorsoventrally flattened, tapering at each end, with a distinct head, 3 thoracic segments, and 9 abdominal segments. The separation between most segments is not visible or clearly delineated.


Dennis D.S.,1105 Myrtle Wood Drive
Journal of the Entomological Research Society | Year: 2015

Proctacanthus fulviventris Macquart, 1850 (during 214 hours of observation) foraged primarily from the ground, capturing and immobilizing prey in flight. Identified prey came from two insect orders (Diptera and Hymenoptera), with Hymenoptera making up 88%. Mating occurred in the male over female position and oviposition was in the ground, typically in the shade of vegetation or a shaded depression in the ground when the sun was shining. This species exhibited a distinct daily rhythm of activity for feeding, mating, and oviposition. Grooming behavior resembled that described for other species of Asilidae. Habitats, resting behavior, and predators and parasites also are discussed.


Dennis D.S.,1105 Myrtle Wood Drive
Journal of the Entomological Research Society | Year: 2015

Diogmites crudelis Bromley, 1936 (during 106 hours of observation) foraged from the ground and vegetation, capturing and immobilizing prey in flight. Identified prey came from three insect orders (Diptera, Hemiptera, and Hymenoptera), with Hymenoptera making up 81.7%. Mating occurred in the tail-to-tail position and oviposition was in the ground, typically in the shade of vegetation when the sun was shining. This species exhibited a distinct daily rhythm of activity for feeding from 10:00 AM to 3:00 PM and oviposition from 10:00 AM to 1:00 PM. Habitats, resting behavior, grooming behavior, and predators and parasites also are discussed.


Dennis D.S.,1105 Myrtle Wood Drive | Barnes J.K.,University of Arkansas
Journal of the Kansas Entomological Society | Year: 2014

The pupal case of the Nearctic robber fly, Efferia snowi (Hine, 1919), is described, illustrated, and compared with the pupal cases of five other Nearctic species. A key is provided to the known pupal cases of Nearctic Efferia species. © Kansas Entomological Society.


Dennis D.S.,1105 Myrtle Wood Drive
Journal of the Entomological Research Society | Year: 2013

Stichopogon trifasciatus (Say, 1823) foraged from the ground, and rocks and small sticks on the ground. Most prey were captured and immobilized in flight. Prey came from the orders Araneae (1.4%), Coleóptera (1.4%), Diptera (26.1%), Hymenoptera (2.9%), Lepidoptera (1.4%), and Orthoptera (66.7%). Mating was generally preceded by male courtship and occurred in the male over female position. Eggs were laid in the soil. The daily rhythm of activity consisted of peaks for both mating and feeding in the morning and afternoon, although after the morning peak these behaviors steadily decreased. Grooming behavior was similar to that described for other species of Asilidae. Habitat, resting behavior, and predators and parasites also are discussed.


Dennis D.S.,1105 Myrtle Wood Drive | Lavigne R.J.,Honorary Research Associate | Lavigne R.J.,University of Wyoming | Dennis J.G.,P.O. Box 861161
Journal of the Entomological Research Society | Year: 2010

Of the approximately 58,000 plus prey records in the Asilidae Predator-Prey Database, 9.1% are Hemiptera (3.5% Heteroptera and 5.6% Homoptera). Forty six of the 133 recognized worldwide Hemiptera families are preyed upon with generally more prey records for female than male robber flies. Potential explanations for robber flies, in particular females, preying upon Hemiptera are discussed. Numbers of Hemiptera prey are examined based on their associated families, genera and species. Hemiptera prey are also discussed in relation to robber fly subfamilies and genera. New records of Hemiptera prey are presented and compared with prey records in the Database.


Dennis D.S.,1105 Myrtle Wood Drive
Journal of the Entomological Research Society | Year: 2012

During 5 weeks of observation, Proctacanthus brevipennis (Wiedemann, 1828) foraged from both the ground and vegetation, capturing and immobilizing most prey in flight. Identified prey came from six insect orders (Coleóptera, Diptera, Hymenoptera, lsoptera, Lepidoptera, and Orthoptera), with Coleoptera making up 59.7%. Mating occurred in the tail-to-tail position and oviposition was in the ground, typically in the shade of vegetation. This species exhibited a distinct daily rhythm of activity for feeding, mating, and oviposition. Grooming behavior resembled that described for other species of Asilidae. Habitat, resting behavior, and predators and parasites also are discussed.

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