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Troy, NY, United States

Gasimli L.,10 8th Avenue | Glass C.A.,University of California at San Diego | Datta P.,10 8th Avenue | Yang B.,10 8th Avenue | And 7 more authors.
Glycobiology | Year: 2014

Heparin (HP), an important anticoagulant polysaccharide, is produced in a complex biosynthetic pathway in connective tissue-type mast cells. Both the structure and size of HP are critical factors determining the anticoagulation activity. A murine mastocytoma (MST) cell line was used as a model system to gain insight into this pathway. As reported, MST cells produce a highly sulfated HP-like polysaccharide that lacks anticoagulant activity (Montgomery RI, Lidholt K, Flay NW, Liang J, Vertel B, Lindahl U, Esko JD. 1992. Stable heparin-producing cell lines derived from the Furth murine mastocytoma. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 89:11327-11331). Here, we show that transfection of MST cells with a retroviral vector containing heparan sulfate 3-O-sulfotransferase-1 (Hs3st1) restores anticoagulant activity. The MST lines express N-acetylglucosamine N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase-1, uronosyl 2-O-sulfotransferase and glucosaminyl 6-O-sulfotransferase-1, which are sufficient to make the highly sulfated HP. Overexpression of Hs3st1 in MST-10H cells resulted in a change in the composition of heparan sulfate (HS)/HP and CS/dermatan sulfate (DS) glycosaminoglycans. The cell-associated HS/HP closely resembles HP with 3-O-sulfo group-containing glucosamine residues and shows anticoagulant activity. This study contributes toward a better understanding of the HP biosynthetic pathway with the goal of providing tools to better control the biosynthesis of HP chains with different structures and activities. © 2013 The Author. Source

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