00 Penn Center Boulevard

Mount Penn, PA, United States

00 Penn Center Boulevard

Mount Penn, PA, United States
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Ramanathan R.,00 Penn Center Boulevard | Adib M.E.,Abu Dhabi City Municipality | Dawoud W.,00 Penn Center Boulevard | Demirkan M.,Abu Dhabi City Municipality | And 4 more authors.
Geotechnical Special Publication | Year: 2016

One of the major driving forces behind the recent popularization of spatial information is the increasing availability of spatial data from governmental and commercial sources. A large number of spatial data depots, digital geolibraries and spatial data warehouses have been developed or are under development in all sectors of modern society. The Municipality of Abu Dhabi City (ADM) recently developed a GIS portal that works as a focal point of information and spatial data-related assets. An important component of this GIS portal is the geohazard information management system (GHIMS), a spatial database system that stores and manages geotechnical, hydrogeological and geophysical data along with interpreted geology, lithology and geohazard risk maps. This paper discusses the approach towards the design and implementation of a spatial database that forms the backbone the GHIMS. All relevant data and information were initially stored in an ESRI geodatabase using a feature based model to maintain consistency and conformity to projection and resolution standards. Configuration controls, attribute domains and topology elements were applied to appropriate feature classes to ensure and maintain data quality standards. Key factors influencing the geodatabase design were data volume, data format and extent of analyses. The geodatabase has feature datasets and raster catalogs that provide geotechnical, geological, and hydrogeological information, and damages related to buildings and infrastructure. The geodatabase also stores intermediary information necessary for generation of geohazard risk maps, such as reclassified rasters, distribution maps, model-builder toolboxes, and tools. The geodatabase was then migrated to the Oracle Spatial environment. Key assumptions, constraints, and decisions taken during the geodatabase design are also discussed along with factors that may affect the database performance, extendibility, and maintainability. © ASCE.


Dawoud W.,00 Penn Center Boulevard | Adib M.E.,Abu Dhabi City Municipality | Reddy G.K.,Abu Dhabi City Municipality | Ramanathan R.S.,00 Penn Center Boulevard | And 3 more authors.
Geotechnical Special Publication | Year: 2016

The Municipality of Abu Dhabi City (ADM) routinely commissions and manages projects where large volumes of data from site investigations are archived by internal and external users. The data includes legacy information from site investigation projects such as borehole logs, interpretive reports, cross sections, and field and lab test data. The information was either in image or paper format. The extensive volume and the format of the data made it impossible to query for specific needs. Also, due to its large quantity, storage and filing systems were cumbersome for users with potential for documents to be misplaced. The Spatial Data Division within the Abu Dhabi Municipality developed the geotechnical information management system (GIMS) as a comprehensive data storage and management solution that enables easy access to all geotechnical data. The geotechnical information from the legacy data were digitized and effectively archived so that it could be made accessible internally and externally. Information relating to the subsurface from 21,257 hardcopy borehole logs and reports were extracted and stored in a gINT database which is compatible with the Association of Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Specialists (AGS) 3.1 data interchange standard. The GIMS database consists of 93 tables; however for the most commonly used field and laboratory tests, a subset database consisting of 30 tables to address specific geotechnical data submittal requirements was developed as well. Strict procedures and standards for geotechnical data submittal applicable to contractors and consultants were also defined to ensure streamlined updates to the database. The GIMS was also designed to interact with other software such as existing GIS and civil design software. A custom geotechnical web map application (WMA) was developed to handle dynamic data delivery to the end user through the web. This GIS integration enables access to existing geotechnical data via the internet or the ADM's intranet. This paper discusses in detail the design decisions, various aspects of implementation and the challenges faced during development of the entire GIMS application. © ASCE.


Farahani R.V.,00 Penn Center Boulevard | Dessalegn T.M.,00 Penn Center Boulevard | Vaidya N.R.,00 Penn Center Boulevard | Bazan-Zurita E.,00 Penn Center Boulevard
Nuclear Engineering and Design | Year: 2016

This study describes three-dimensional (3-D) finite element (FE) modeling and seismic Soil-Structure Interaction (SSI) analysis of a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) Diesel Generator Building (DGB) that is founded on soil in degraded concrete stiffness condition. A new technique is presented that uses two horizontal and vertical FE models to consider the concrete stiffness reduction of NPP buildings subjected to orthogonal ground motion excitations, in which appropriate stiffness reduction factors, based on the input motion orientation, are applied. Seismic SSI analysis is performed for each model separately, and dynamic responses are calculated in the three global directions. The results of the analysis for the two FE models are then combined, using the square-root-of-the-sum-of-squares (SRSS) combination rule. A sensitivity analysis is also performed to investigate the subsurface profile effect on the In-Structure (acceleration) Response Spectra (ISRS) of the building when subjected to site-specific Foundation Input Response Spectra (FIRS) that exhibit high spectral amplifications in the high-frequency range. The sensitivity analysis considers three strain-compatible subsurface profiles that represent Lower-Bound (LB), Best-Estimate (BE), and Upper-Bound (UB) conditions at the DGB site. The sensitivity analysis results indicate that the seismic response of the DGB founded on soil highly depends on the subsurface profile; i.e., each of the LB, BE, and UB subsurface profiles can maximize building seismic response when subjected to FIRS that exhibit high spectral amplifications in the high-frequency range. Therefore, it is important to consider SSI parameter variability in the seismic design or evaluation of NPP buildings that bear on soil. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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